Childhood Unplugged Features Stephanie Bryan

Today on Childhood Unplugged I am so excited to share a little bit about an artist that I am having fun getting to know lately. I first discovered Stephanie Bryan’s work through a private Facebook group for those who have purchased Jonathan Canlas FINDinabox. Her work is whimsy, colorful, fun and full of fleeting childhood moments of her two little ones. So without further ado let’s dive in!

Tell us a bit about yourself and your family.

Hi! I’m Stephanie! I live in Raleigh, NC with my two sweet kiddos (Anna + Drew) and my husband Scott, where I spend most of my days with a camera in hand photographing our days and the days of others. When I’m not snapping away, I am reading a book, taking a run or just goofing off with my kids (probably the latter).

I know you love to shoot film. Tell us a little bit about why you choose film especially to document your children?

Photography has been my passion for as long as I can remember and truly allows me to get in touch with my creative side. Last year, I started my journey back into film photography after struggling with a lack of creativity/excitement with my personal (digital) work. I was always SO focused on WHAT I captured on the back of my screen that I lost the whole concept of capturing moments and recording memories. I found myself often disappointed with my final result – and often frustrated with my kids for not falling into that moment like I had expected. Film is absolutely magical to me and it has completely changed how I photograph my own family and others. Film makes me slow down, watch the scene and wait for the moment. I see the world differently with a film camera.

Playing together is so important. What are some of your favorite unplugged activities to do with your kids?

My husband and I always say that the best thing we ever did for our children is to give them each other. They truly are best friends and spend about 99% of their time playing random games and pretend scenarios. As a family, we LOVE spending time outside at parks (my husband loves to fly kites), playing board games and basically doing anything that involves a challenge. Our absolute favorite game, though, is this simple little game called “Animal Wars” we made up at dinner one night. We are very much an “anti-electronic” family at the dinner table and we use this time to sit down together, talk about our day and play our silly game. I love it because it brings us together and makes us really listen to one another without the distraction of electronics. 

Do you always keep a camera on hand? If so, what is your go to camera?

I find I go through phases with my camera. I tried doing the “photo a day” challenge last year and ended up feeling more bored and frustrated than inspired. Now I pick my camera up when the inspiration hits and go crazy. I’ve learned that it’s totally ok to NOT be photographing every single moment of our lives. Sometimes it’s better to live them, you know? But I do always have my cameras close by just in case! My go-to camera is my Canon 1V loaded with Kodak ColorPlus 200 film!

It’s Saturday morning with no agenda in sight. You have the entire day to spend with your family. What does that look like? Go!

Well that sounds ideal for sure! Our day would probably start with pancakes, coffee and snuggles on the couch followed by a few epic games of War (my son is slightly obsessed with this game). Then we’d probably venture out for some time at the park (with our kite in hand) and then finish it off with a bonfire in our backyard and some steaks on the grill! Sounds delightful!

Do you have an all time favorite image? If so, share it with us and tell us why you hold the memory so near and dear.

Gah! I don’t think I could pick just one. I love so many of our captured moments for so many different reasons. I think every picture I’ve ever taken takes me back to that specific moment and makes me feel something. They may not be perfectly composed or technically correct, but I just love them all.

Do you have any rules for the kids when it comes to screen time (television, computer, video games)? There is no wrong or right answer. Just always curious how other families are balancing it all out.

For our family, electronics are only allowed on the weekends (and then only in moderation). We are so busy with school, homework and sports during the week that we really just don’t have any time for electronics. For my kids, out of sight truly is out of mind. They rarely ask to play games or watch television because we just don’t do it that often. They spend the majority of their time out on our trampoline or playing in the backyard with our neighbors! 

It’s a new year. Any new personal projects on the horizon?

I’m a rules follower by nature. I like order and consistency and structure. But sometimes that just feels so darn boring. So for me, 2018 is all about stepping out of my “comfort zone” and trying new things when it comes to my personal work. Basically I’m throwing the rules and others expectations out the window and allowing myself to be different, seek out weirdness and embrace whatever comes along! 

What do you most want your children to look back on and remember from their childhood?

My husband and I talk about this all the time. I think for me, I want them to look back on their childhood and see nothing but happiness, joy and love. I want them to remember our time together as a family- our evenings of playing War, our lazy Saturday trips to the park and our awesome “Animal Wars” battles at dinner- and see that we were always together and that they are truly loved.

Thank you Stephanie for taking some time to share a bit about yourself with our readers. It’s honestly been a delight. xo, Monica Calderin

 

website: http://www.stephaniebryanphoto.com

instagram: http://www.instagram.com/stephaniebryanphoto

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stephaniebryanphoto/


Childhood Unplugged Features Kirsty Larmour

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Her work has been featured in several publications, interviews and exhibitions. In 2015 she was listed as one of the top 100 photographers to watch. Her and her husband are passionate about travelling and sharing this great big beautiful world with their two daughters. If you visit her websites and/or Instagram page you will see what I mean, there is just something magical about their travels. I seriously enjoy following their journey. So without further ado….

Welcome Kirsty to Childhood Unplugged! We are so very thrilled to be featuring you on our blog. Tell us a bit about yourself and your family.

Hello and thank you for having me here. I’m a British photographer-Mama, with an Irish husband and two daughters who were born in China and the United Arab Emirates. We are based in Abu Dhabi, but lucky enough to spend a lot of time on the road exploring the beauty the big wide world has to offer. Read More


Childhood Unplugged features Deborah Parkin

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Today on Childhood Unplugged I have the distinct privilege to be interviewing Deborah Parkin; an artist who’s work documenting her family life and environment has been exhibited and published worldwide and is held in many private collections from individual collectors to museums and galleries including the Fox Talbot Museum (UK), the Centre for Fine Art Photography (US) and the Charlet Gallery (Paris).

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Childhood Unplugged Features Jeremy and Ashley Parsons with We Are The Parsons

I came across the Parsons through a Don’t Give Up story that you can watch here. I remember it impacting me profoundly. I needed more. I wanted to learn more about these artists, and I did. They offered a class through The Define School called Around The Table. It was through this class that I learned more about how important it is to keep our photographs uncensored. To allow our images to tell the true story. Our paths have continued to cross over the past couple of years and I am completely honored to be featuring them here on Childhood Unplugged today. So without further ado…

Welcome Jeremy and Ashley!  Could you share briefly about yourselves for our readers?

Thank you so much for hosting our thoughts and images in this special place, the pleasure is all ours! 

We are a couple of dreamers and makers who live, love, and raise three wonderful boys (and six chickens) in a 130 year old home on an oversized lot in the midwest United States. We’ve been married for fifteen years, professional photographers for ten of those, and we count ourselves really privileged to be able to run our own business and do what we love for a living. Most of our photography work involves shooting weddings all over the world, or telling stories of motherhood with Ash’s latest project morningswithyou.com . We are also a bit strange in the sense that we have been off of social media for about a year and three months now, and have no desire to return. We podcast about our social media hiatus on iTunes at The Boredom Experiment, and this project is a family event, so that’s been really fun. Jeremy grew up a pastor’s kid climbing mountains with his dad in Colorado. His secret superpowers are that he lifts things and builds things. I (Ash) grew up as a missionary kid learning to ride my bike on the red dirt roads in Africa. My secret superpowers include playing with words in a little trailer in our back yard and homemaking. Read More


Childhood Unplugged Features Nate Kaiser

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I’ve admired and have been a huge fan of Nate Kaiser’s film work for quite a few years now. It brings me great pleasure to be featuring his personal work today on Childhood Unplugged.

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Tell us a bit about yourself and your family.

I’m Nate, husband to Jaclyn, father to Grace (12) and Jasper (8). Jaclyn and I got married when we were 18 and 21, and 12 days before our one year anniversary we welcomed our daughter Grace into the world. We’ve been married for 13 years and have run our wedding and portrait photography business, The Image Is Found together for the past 14 years. We do photography full time, while balancing homeschooling our children, and travel much of the year to wherever our wedding schedule happens to take us.

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Childhood Unplugged Features World Renowned Artist Alain Laboile

 

In the world of photography there is a term known as the decisive momentHenri Cartier-Bresson said it best, “To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event as well as of a precise organization of forms which give that event its proper expression.” A moment in time… the way we see it is not as easy to capture as you may think. It takes patience, a good eye and a love for what you are capturing.

Alain Laboile, a self-taught French artist, quickly mastered finding the decisive moment and has created an incredible body of work. He picked up a camera in 2004 to document his work as a sculptor. Discovering the macro setting on the camera, he took an interest in photographing insects, some of which he submitted to online photography contests and won. In 2007, a whole new world of art was about to begin for Laboile as he pointed his camera towards his family and realized his greatest subjects were right in front of him. At his countryside home, “At The Edge Of The World” in France as he likes to say, he captures the everyday moments of his children’s childhood. The backdrop of his studio is his environment, nature itself. He began to submit his work online and immediately started to receive responses. Within weeks, his art spread worldwide, and he credits this success to social media. With his work displayed in the French Museum of Photography; the first French museum to exhibit his photographs in their 2014 exhibition ‘Aux frontieres de l’intime’ and two books already published with his art, Alain Laboile has definitely made a name for himself among one of the masters.

We are beyond honored to be featuring his art and asking him a few questions in regards to his children’s unplugged upbringing. Welcome Alain to Childhood Unplugged!

Do you remember that pivotal moment when you turned your lens from photographing insects towards your family in 2007 and realized you were onto something big, which was the beginning of your work La Famille?

Yes, it was after the birth of my fifth child in 2007, I pointed my lens towards my growing family and this was, though I did not realize it at first, the starting point of my family album.

I have spent a good amount of time admiring your art and one thought keeps coming to mind, “What an amazing childhood his children are living!” It is not often you see children one with their environment and nature as your children are. How have you seen this lifestyle shape them as individuals?

This simple life close to nature shows them that we can be happy and creative while having a simple life by limiting the consumerism. Each animal is a gift: a rabbit, a fox, a squirrel, a hedgehog, a mole, a mouse, a snake, a spider, a toad… kids are allowed to touch them, but they know that they are not allowed to hurt them. They learn respect. The kids wanted a swimming pool. We decided to dig it ourselves. It was hard-handed work. The entire family was involved in the project. They now know the meaning of effort. There is no ideology hidden behind our lifestyle. We raise our children by following our intuition.

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Your six children range in age. While it is easy to document children when they are younger, it becomes more of a challenge as they get older. Do you find that your older children no longer want to be photographed? Or, are they still fine with it?

They never complained that their pictures appear all over the internet. They are proud to see their photos exhibited and published all over the world. I always show my images to my wife and to my children. If one picture is embarrassing for someone, I delete it. If I take less photographs of my teens it is only because they spend much more time out of the home.

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I read that your own childhood “had little restraint, no sense of urgency and no concept of time.” growing up in the countryside of France. Did you know before you started your family that this was the way you wanted to raise your children?

We were four brothers, a little bit left to our own, exploring the countryside, not very involved schoolishly. I do not have many memories of my childhood, and no photographs. Both my wife and I grew up in the countryside and we only knew that we wanted to be extremely present for our children. Today it is still the environment that best suits our peaceful family lifestyle. We sometimes feel the lack of cultural opportunities, but we live only 40 km from Bordeaux and three hours by train from Paris.

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Unplugging is so important in childhood, but in today’s society there is also a lot of good that comes from technology. You yourself credit social media for your success. I believe there exists a healthy balance between the two. Do your children, especially your older ones, spend time on technological devices? 

We have no television, but many computers. First of all, we want to protect ourselves from uninteresting programs and unbearable presenters! Watching television is a total passive activity. Furthermore, the children spend more time outside and play more together without it. We recently started homeschooling. The internet has been a valuable resource.

Do you have boundaries and time restrictions for it? 

Not really. We are not very strict regarding schedules like meals and bedtime. When you live with teenagers and small children, you have to be flexible to preserve harmony. The prohibition provokes the frustration. A supervised freedom protects the balance.

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You are giving your children a priceless gift by photographing their childhood. What do you want them to remember most when they look back?

Time goes by so quickly. I would like my photos to allow my children to dive back into their childhood when they are adults and feel past emotions. These photographs can be a good help to build themselves as parents. We understand our children better when we remember the child whom we once were and how we lived.

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In the majority of your photographs you have captured of your young children, they have very little to no clothes on. While I know this is mostly cultural and completely innocent, there are many people who have a problem with photographing children in the nude. Take Sally Mann for example and all the grief she received for her work Immediate Family. Have you ever had any backlash or negative publicity because of it?

We live in the countryside, in an isolated place. Our children evolve in accordance with nature and the youngest get undressed spontaneously when the weather is fine. As they get older, and the notion of modesty comes, they dress again. It is this infantile nudity which sometimes raises problems. It is sexualized and demonized and this is when the censorship appears. Thanks to my publishers and gallerists, I can show all my photographic work without restriction. I do not mind criticism and attacks on social networks.

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You have had worldwide recognition and success with La Famille, a portfolio that you have continued to build. As your children grow into young adults where do you see your art heading in the future?

My little ones are 7 and 8. Two of my teens live at home and the elders spend a lot of time with the family. I usually never photograph kids other than my own. However, when I know them very well, I sometimes make an exception. My oldest daughter’s boy friend whom I’ve known since he was 3 years old, appears in some family photos. Some day, the grand children will enlarge the family. I am not worried about my photographic future! I have a lot of photographic projects in mind.

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Alain Laboile’s latest book “At The Edge Of The World ” is available for purchase. I myself own a copy and let me tell you, it is absolutely gorgeous.

To see more of his work, visit Alain Laboile

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Childhood Unplugged Features Zalmy Berkowitz

I remember scrolling past an image on Facebook of a little girl skipping along the sidewalk and her shadow reflecting against a wooden fence. I remember the image caught my eye and I clicked on it. From that first image, Zalmy Berkowitz has captivated me with his film photography. His art and passion for Documenting The Chaos is the real deal. I am beyond thrilled to have him as our guest for the month of August.

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Welcome Zalmy to Childhood Unplugged! We are excited to have you as our featured guest. Could you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Oh man. Having no clue what you meant by this (if you wanted a few pithy lines, or a complete autobiography), I checked out some of the previous featured guests. Holy eloquence! (I’m looking at you Amy Grace, you ruin it for all of us!) I’m going to sound like the total Neanderthal here. That’s okay I guess. 

I was born and bred (to an extent) in Huntington Beach, CA, where my father was (and still is) a communal rabbi. Growing up in a Hasidic household in the middle of Huntington Beach was a bit of a clash of two worlds, and it took me a while to realize that the point is to reconcile the two, that one doesn’t exclude the other. Until 10 or so I just spaced out. Seriously. I read everything I could get my hands on and ignored the world. Went through all the Hardy Boys, much of the encyclopedia, all the ingredient lists on everything in the bathroom, even Nancy Drew when no one was looking. Early on I went to a Jewish Day School, and for 6th and 7th I went to a “Yeshiva” (Jewish school, focusing much more on Jewish studies than they do secular studies) in Los Angeles. That was my last year of any formal secular eduction. When my parents split I moved with my mother to Brooklyn and spent the next three years in a hardcore Yeshiva there. Then three years in Israel, another in New York (where I was appointed “official beer buyer” at 18 because of my beard), another in Israel, and than got my rabbinic degree in Pretoria, South Africa. 

Freshly rabbi(ed) and looking to change the world, I married the amazing Estee at 22 or so and we moved to a little ancient mountain town called Safed in Israel, home to wanderers and mystics, where someone (not a mystic), somehow downloaded Photoshop to our iMac (back when no one knew what an iMac was). That started my journey in the visual arts, though I didn’t know it back then. We came back to Southern California to run some programs for Jewish teens. I was designing our fliers and such and got a bit into it, started designing for others etc. Then we had baby number one. Then two. At this point I was getting annoyed at the lack of Jewish stock photography available for my designing so I bought some sort of Canon Rebel and figured it couldn’t be too hard. I never ended up taking those stock images but I did start shooting my family. 

I like learning, so I spent months at the library reading up on photography. The how-to books, the why-to books, the where-to and what-to. I tried this lens and that lens, and this camera and that camera. At some point I saw a Hasselblad in my local camera shop and thought it looked cool. So I bought it and a roll of film. The film didn’t fit, and that’s how I learned about medium format. Some 20 cameras later I know a bit more. Then came number three. At number four we moved into a slightly dilapidated house with a humongous yard (for our locale). Then five.  At which point we decided to move to Berkeley, (I just looked at the question and saw that it says “Could you tell us a LITTLE about yourself?” …oops) and have been working on that for the past year or so.

Your photography is just captivating. It pulls you in and leaves you wanting more. To do that as a photographer is hard, but to do it with film is just downright talent. It takes a keen eye (and a bit of luck) to know the precise moment to push the shutter button. Tell me why you decided to shoot film as your medium in a digital world. Do you ever shoot digital?

Hmmm, first of all, thanks! I think I answered a bit above. Film made me think much more before I took the shot. I would move the extra inch or foot to get a better angle. I’d clear that garbage, or climb the fence. I’d pay more attention to the light. And I’d put the camera down more often. With kids it’s always challenging where and how to draw the line between documenting and being in the moment. With film, you take your shot and move on. You finish your roll and put the camera away. I love the way the older cameras feel. They are so darn simple. An aperture ring and a shutter speed. What else do you need? They do their job and get out-of-the-way. Film cameras are also much simpler to make as the most complicated part, the actual film, was made by someone else. So there are all sorts of wonderful quirky cameras. All sorts of formats. I really enjoy shooting with a waist-level finder (especially kids), and I’m addicted to squares. Film just makes that easier. And the main part is that film just looks pretty darn awesome. 

Besides all that, as I grew with photography I came to realize that “perfect” and “clean” wasn’t only overrated, it (for me) was totally off point. We live in a messy, grainy, messy, and beautifully imperfect world. With digital I was always making sure my images were “tack sharp” etc. And I didn’t even know why. Why should an image be tack sharp? Why should it be clean? Film allowed me to escape that obsession, and focus on making images that emote, not just images that speak.

What are some unplugged activities your family enjoys together?

Sleeping. Well I enjoy that, the kids maybe not as much. You caught me at a challenging time as we’ve been out of our house (with our huge year and friends) and not yet in Berkeley with all it’s parks and homeschooling options. We read a lot. I’ll tell stories from Jewish history (ancient and recent) or the Bible. We try to get out to parks, the beach is right nearby so we hit that a lot (though it always freaks me out). We play catch and frisbee and all that normal, not exciting or exotic at all stuff 🙂 Once in a while I’ll take a kid on a hike, or bird watching. When in Berkeley we would go to the Lawrence Hall of Science like twice a week or so. That place is amazing. Adventure playground on Sundays… man we miss it there and can’t wait to get back.

Saturdays are completely unplugged as it’s our Sabbath, and we’re pretty strict about it. It’s so nice to not only have a day where we unplug, but a day where plugging is so completely out of the question that it stays out of mind as well. 

Your children are still very young, do you have rules for things like television, computers or handheld devices?

We try. Sometimes their watching gets a bit out of hand so we ban it for a few weeks. Generally we’ll do maybe a movie a week and a show or two in between. Curious George for the young ones, Wild Kratts or something for the older (the oldest is 8). My oldest likes building stuff so he watches a lot of how-to videos. I’m fine with that. The only game they play is Minecraft, maybe an hour each a week. There are a lot of good educational videos out there. We do let them watch Jewish videos that teach good values and morals, history, etc., though we do believe that videos are generally an inferior way of educating, and that (again, generally speaking) any moment glued to a screen is a moment lost to a better, healthier activity. It’s so easy to use the iPad or whatever as a quick babysitter when we need to get stuff done, but we always pay the consequences. Our recent move has been a little challenging for the kids as well so we give in a little (or a lot) sometimes. But there are always trade-offs and being an imperfect parent is part of being a perfect one.

If you and your family woke up one morning and had no agenda other than to spend the day together, what would that day look like?

Wake up to screaming kids that have been up for two hours (though they would have already taken the baby out of his crib and gotten him dressed, and honestly would have been playing nicely for the vast majority of those two hours), make breakfast that three want and two don’t. Try to fix that. Hide in the bathroom and breathe a bit. Come back and talk to the kids about the day. They’ll probably have already done some reading (hebrew and english) on their own, and the older two do their prayers on their own as well, so that’s cool. Then we’ll pack up some snacks and throw everyone in the car (that sounds quick but those two things together take an hour). Maybe we’ll head to the beach, or a park. Maybe we’d have called a friend to meet up with us. The kids will have fun, then fight, then have fun… more fun. We’ll laugh at some hysterical thing my four-year old says. Fight some more. We’ll go home, and I’ll shove a beer in the freezer, begging it to hurry up. Then I’ll relax a bit with the kids, play some ball in front. Forget about the beer because I don’t need it anymore. Then we’ll eat supper, after which the kids will freak out about going to bed. At which point I remember my beer, but it’s frozen… Or something like that. Sometimes the kids don’t fight 🙂

Unplugging is just as important if not more important for adults as it is for children, what do you enjoy doing when you have time for yourself?

Time for myself? I’m not sure that computes 🙂 If possible I’d spend it with my wife. Go out for a walk, a drink, or just to sit somewhere and talk. Maybe learn a bit together. If it was just me, well, I absolutely LOVE learning. If I have the time and mental capacity (i.e. I’m not exhausted) I’ll get lost in some book about Jewish mysticism, law, morals, or history. If I have less energy maybe a good biography, history, or a good book of stories. Other times I’ll go for a walk, a jog, a bicycle ride, nothing too exciting 🙂 but it does wonders for the soul.

Do you have a favorite image? Tell me a bit about this image.

This is hard. I’m not really sure. Maybe it’s the Polaroid of my oldest walking off a table. A good image to me is something that’s both a meaningful memory to me as a parent, and at the same time has a universal message. It’s a good image of my kids goofing off, but I feel like it encapsulates that wonder of childhood. Before we are all jaded adults who know the outcome of everything and have left nothing left to wonder. We all know that we can’t fly, but children aren’t so sure. “Yeah I usually fall when I walk off a table, but maybe this time…” There’s also the brotherly support holding him up, or maybe pushing him down, or maybe both… 

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So much is going on in your photographs. It’s like eye candy. I love how you capture things as is, the mess, the movement, etc. Do your children ever get bothered by your photo taking or are they pretty much immune to it?

I rarely ask them to do anything so they usually don’t mind. Once in a while I overdo it and they get annoyed that I’m not in the moment. And they are totally right. 

Twenty years from now, what do you want your children to remember most about their childhood?

The freedom. The wonder. The memory of trying hard to do something new and finally succeeding. The idea that learning is and can be fun, and that we are always shaping who we are. Irrespective of what society tells us. I want them to be unique and weird and proud of it. 

Children remember more than we think they do, thus why spending time together and creating memories is so important. If you were to ask your children to share one of their favorite memories what would they say? 

Probably going to New York, which was a crazy trip for us. Or maybe just playing elimination in the front yard. Or if there was a really good breakfast that day maybe that… I’m not sure 🙂 I think in 10 years the answers will be more revealing.

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